Playing with Tradition - Making (Vegan) Lithuanian Kaldunai

Playing with Tradition - Making (Vegan) Lithuanian Kaldunai 

   Over Christmas break, I had the fortune to travel home and spend some time with my family. One evening, my mother took me to Maironis Park (Shrewsbury, Mass.) to learn to cook a proper Lithuanian dish from an old family friend starting up a casual, monthly cooking course. We made Kaldunai, or Lithuanian dumplings. These may be made from a few basic ingredients and for various occasions. They may be made with blueberries for desserts on Christmas Eve, mushrooms, pork, or anything you'd like. Most people in the class used a combination of pork and chicken, but being a non-meat eater, I made an onion and mushroom dumpling. This was made with butter, but I've now made my own (on my own!) completely vegan. 

I highly recommend this recipe for those who like traditional, belly-warming foods: perfect for wintertime!

*Note - my gallery blocks are malfunctioning so the images are a bit out of order, but I think you can catch on. 

Ingredients:

Dough: 

1 1/2 c. flour

1/2 c. water

1 tsp. salt

1 egg optional - if you are a non-vegan, the egg makes the dough chewier but is frequently left out of the recipe

Filling: 

1 carton mushrooms (plain white caps or choice of preference) -diced 

1 yellow onion - diced 

1 garlic clove - diced finely, raw

dash of marjarom (if you don't have this, a bit less of oregano or Italian spice mix will do)

salt and pepper to taste

vegan butter of choice (I like Pure's sunflower oil butter spread)


   To start off, the mushrooms should be diced and fried in butter until a soft, warm brown and just a bit past. This should be done first since the mushrooms need to cool off before being stuffed. Be generous with the butter so the mushrooms may soak in all its buttery goodness. After this you want to drain any water cooked out of the mushrooms and set aside. Start frying the onion until it begins to soften and brown (do not overcook, you want some white remaining!) As this is cooking, you can set a large pot full of salted water to boil. 

   The dough is much easier than I expected, but a bit messy. As with much traditional cooking (like every recipe I ask for from my mother) it is 'to the eye.' I had doubled the dough recipe but ended up with way to much, so I cut the ingredients in half for this entry. All you need to do is put the flour, water, and salt in a bowl and knead it together with your hands. This will be sticky and messy but good fun. You should work the dough until it is decently solid and no longer sticky, if necessary add more flour. (Note: it will be sticky at first until the dough is worked for a few minutes) This process takes only about 10 minutes.

   Check the onions and if they are done, pour half into the mushroom bowl. To this mixture, add a few dashes of salt, pepper, and a large dash of marjoram. I love salt and added more than the recipe called for, and would do so again. The marjoram really amps up the filling from tasting too plain and of bland mushroom. Mix in the garlic here as well. This then, again, should cool. The other half of the onions can keep cooking on low heat to a nice crisp. These will be used as a topping later on.

  Now roll the dough, be generous with the flour to keep it from getting to sticky. You want the dough to be very thin, but not yet transparent. This about of dough with make about 35 small dumplings, about 3-4 servings. I eat a lot, but most people probably would only eat 8-9 in a sitting. After rolling, cut the dough using a glass cup and stuff the circles with the cooled down filling. It is okay if the filling is still a bit warm. Each circle will have a small teaspoon of filling, then should be folded in half and pressed closed. Be sure to really close the dumpling and score it with a fork or your nail to keep them from falling apart during boiling. 

   After filling the dumplings, sprinkle some flour on both sides to keep them from sticking in the pot. After dusting, you may cook them all or choose to freeze them. Once the water is boiling, add the dumplings to the pot. Like ravioli, do not over fill the pot or try to cook too many at once. The dumplings will sink; stir them gently. Once they all are floating, let them cook for five minutes. Since there is no meat to cook, the dough is all you need to worry about and can taste test. I would not cook over about 7 minutes. 

  Place the cooked dumplings in a colander or a paper towel to remove excess water, then plate up. This dish is normally topped with a mixture of onion and bacon bits, butter, and sour cream (healthy, I know!). I added more fake butter, salt, and the crispy onions. It was delicious, and this morning I fried some leftovers in oil. It is even better this way. Other than making too much dough, I think it turned out quite nicely. 

Good luck making your own or daydreaming of warm, winter foods!

mmm....butter substitute, my love. 

mmm....butter substitute, my love. 

Winter: Strafford, NH vs. Newcastle, UK

    In anticipation for my journey back home for Christmas, I've compiled a few photographs comparing this year's fall/winter seasons of my parents home (in Strafford, New Hampshire) and my current place of residency, Newcastle upon Tyne.  Both are beautiful, but in quite different ways. While I love living in Newcastle, I am ridiculously excited to return to a place with snow. Click the photos for captions.

Also, for everyone's enjoyment, a couple of my father's photos of NH include his two puppies, Bea and Rex. Enjoy!

Enjoy your winter celebrations wherever in the world you are. Stay warm and dry!

And one more puppy photo for the road. 

Nov. 15, 2014. Photo: Sam Sutton

THE REPURPOSING OF A GREEK STATUE

The physical and digital combine in a video installation that addresses the boundaries of time, myths, and the methodology of how those ideas are communicated by artist Hazel Brill.

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
   Hazel Brill,  In Bardo: Act Two 2014  Image courtesy Colin Davison. 

Hazel Brill, In Bardo: Act Two 2014 Image courtesy Colin Davison. 

           It is rare that a gallery associated with a major art institution holds open submissions, and rarer still that one artist selected is capable of genuinely impressing and surprising the local audience. BALTIC 39 I FIGURE TWO was the second open submission exhibition at the Baltic 39 gallery in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. The program, consisting of 10 projects by different artists for the duration of five days each over the course of five weeks, attempted to provide a space for artists to show experimental works in any media in a public context. During Week 2 of the Figure Two series (13-17August, 2014) the young artist Hazel Brill exhibited In Bardo: Act Two and, in retrospect, was the highlight of the series.

            Hazel Brill recently graduated in 2014 with her BA in fine arts from Newcastle University. In her degree show, Brill presented In Bardo (also called In Bardo: Act One), a 9-minute video installation projecting her film onto multiple shaped canvases, the floor, and a freshly painted university plaster Greek statue. The asymmetrical composition took turns lighting up with impressively arranged projections of three dimensional renderings and animations loosely illustrating a narrative presented by an eerie and slightly comical monotone voiceover. The content of the work addressed the retelling of myths, seemingly tangential facts, and instructions initially inspired by online tutorials and interactive videos such as Second Life and spiritual communication platforms. In Bardo: Act Two was a continuation and expansion of Brill’s degree work.

            Brill’s latest installation at the Baltic 39 was composed, this time, of an expanding symmetrical composition centered in the large gallery space. The gallery was completely dark aside from the 11-minute video played on loop. The narrative installation was projected onto two folded screens, another university borrowed statue and three smaller sculptural fragments. The video, made using computer-generated animation and projection mapping programs, washed overs the objects and occasionally framed a border that stretched across the gallery space. The virtual realm and the physical existed simultaneously in the constructed stage. The video, like her degree work, was a montage of images from online sources and animations that were smattered and blurred with information on the protagonist. The plaster statue transitioned from being the protagonist of the story, to a set piece the video played over: back and forth from object to wall depending on the needs of the script. Brill believes the plaster cast to be of the Greek god Hermes: the messenger god, the god of transitions and boundaries. If true, the statue is a fitting metaphor for Brill’s continued interest in liminal time and realities of the physical and the online realm. Bardo is a Tibetan word expressing the intermediary space between death and rebirth. The title of the two-part series In Bardo, speaks of these transitioning worlds.

              The monologue that echoed through the gallery was composed of roughly three main scenes interspersed with repetitions and bits of information on Hermes’ story. The information Brill used in her videos were all found online from sites with varying degrees of reliability. The ‘facts’ are from blogs, online tutorials, Wikipedia, outdated websites, enthusiasts and other public platforms that lack authenticity.  While the information remained skeptical, the voiceover was presented in a confident, authoritative tone that the audience would normally be expected to trust. The scenes contained versions of an instructional video on how to be a clairvoyant, cooking instructions of meat that was related back to the human body, and on sensory deprivation as a recommendation for finding clarity in mind and spirit.

              The whole work itself was an overload of stimuli from the sound effects, to the voiceover, to the set pieces, and to various animations including those of waves flooding the set, rotating meat pieces with fans, collaged images of the body, religious iconography, text, gravestones spinning in darkness, and a vase and cloth that slipped around in space shifting from marble to fabric. The monologue helped explain the images as they unveiled themselves over the various pieces of the set, yet at times the voice simply added to the sensory confusion. One of the most hypnotizing animations involved the viewer entering a cemetery gate and ‘walking’ through the cemetery on a nonexistent wheel as it rolled forward and then later revealed its form from the side, only to start rotating again. The first-person video game element transformed the viewers from voyeurs to participants.

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
   Hazel Brill,  In Bardo: Act Two 2014             Image courtesy Colin Davison at   rosellastudios.com

Hazel Brill, In Bardo: Act Two 2014          Image courtesy Colin Davison at rosellastudios.com

             The stimulus overload all cumulated in a captivating visual display that could impress any viewer without need for deeper meaning. But it is those deeper issues that took In Bardo: Act Two from an exploratory process to a professional standing work worthy of contemplation. Brill expertly merged multiple inspirations and themes into a singular, coherent piece. The more accessible themes dealt with trust of online sources, technologies and realities in the physical versus the digital world, spirituality and clarity in cyberspace, appropriation of past stories into relevant metaphorical teaching tools, and the how the ideas of liminal time and space play into those topics listed above. Boiling all these ideas down to a singular theme is challenging and possibly overly simplifying Brill’s work, but the transitions of the in-betweens is a possible contender. The Hermes sculpture in a contemporary artwork represents it. The title word Bardo represents it. The text seeking to connect the physical world and cyberspace addresses it.

             Brill does not always provide a clear preference in these comparisons. It seems she is posing and exploring the topics herself and encouraging the viewer to find their own opinions with her. This refrain from clarity is essential to the success of Brill’s work. In Bardo: Act Two contains so many themes and collages so many ideas, that allowing room for the viewer to recognize and then process the metaphors themselves becomes the greatest success of the work.

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
   Hazel Brill,  In Bardo: Act Two 2014    Image courtesy Colin Davison. 

Hazel Brill, In Bardo: Act Two 2014 Image courtesy Colin Davison. 

            If any critiques were to be made of Brill’s In Bardo: Act Two it would have been in the presentation of the set elements. The smaller, sculptural fragments drifted away from Hermes loosening the relationship between the objects as the symmetrical composition removed valuable tension and form found in the first In Bardo. As the small pieces became peripheral objects, they were rendered unnecessary which, in a work where all parts needed to contribute, is a small disappointment. The purpose and placement of the fragments aside, In Bardo: Act Two has few weaknesses for an exploratory work that brings so much new and refreshing to the projection installation art form. Projection videos are increasingly popular in contemporary art and can be found in art festivals and public artworks worldwide. Brill took this trending technique and brought it to a rare level of sophistication with her developed metaphors. The perplexing and at times absurd work was presented at a professional standing rarely found in small, contemporary galleries.

              Brill’s works are so much more than a segmented narrative with stunning projected animations on repurposed screens and borrowed sculptures. They are inspirational stories capable of deep analysis where the content of the work is of equal importance to the artistic technique resulting in a balanced and satisfying installation. Brill has all the promises of a contemporary storyteller. She uses tales as they were originally designed- not only to entertain- but to communicate metaphors that examine contemporary society or everyday life and morals. Hazel Brill bridges the gap of time by repurposing the myths of old into a new context relevant to today’s electronic society. In Bardo: Act Two is well worth the 11-minute viewing time and I fully expect to see more from Brill in the near future. For the time being, you can catch up on the In Bardo series at hazelbrill.com. 

 

SRLS              October 10, 2014

 

 

A Sunday Outing in Barnard Castle

   This past weekend I had the opportunity (i.e. had access to a friend with a car) to visit Barnard Castle in Durham Country. Despite the fact that I have lived in the UK for over a year now, a quaint English town still fills me with the desire to squeal and eat it all up with a tiny spoon. The ride through the countryside was picturesque in a midday mist and the late autumn sun peeked through the clouds in bursts warming the stone buildings and castle ruins.

Ruins of Barnard Castle 2014 SRLS

Ruins of Barnard Castle 2014 SRLS

   After parking the car, we first took a walk down to the river and headed towards the ruins of the English Heritage site: Barnard Castle.  We choose not to pay to go into the 12th century building; the view from the river was enough for this trip and instead we walked uphill into the town center (the English Heritage website describes the center village as a “working market town also known as ‘Barney’”). 

Barnard Castle 2014 SRLS

Barnard Castle 2014 SRLS

   The town center was filled with little shops: pubs, teashops, secondhand and charity stores, etc. We meandered into a few places and I bought a Katherine Mansfield book from a genuinely lovely, lady working at Book Aid.  It would be a wonderful location to wile away a morning window-shopping. 

Vintage Graphics Sign 2014 SRLS

Vintage Graphics Sign 2014 SRLS

Interesting Fact: The character on the sign above is named Struwwelpeter from the German children’s book Der Struwwelpeter (1845) by Heinrich Hoffmann. Its ten rhymed stories teach different moral lessons with extreme consequences for poor behavior. My ausflug companion is originally from Munich and told me a few of the tales as we strolled, emphasizing the nightmares that accompanied this children’s book. 

Bowes Museum 2014 SRLS

Bowes Museum 2014 SRLS

   Our main afternoon event was visiting the Bowes Museum. This 19th c. French château was build by John and Joséphine Bowes to house their fine and decorative art collection. The permanent painting collection includes works by artists such as El Greco, Courbet, Turner, and Canaletto. There are also rooms of ceramics, house decorative arts, a room of Joséphine Bowes’ paintings, and the iconic Bowes Silver Swan: an 18th c. musical automaton at plays at 2.00pm everyday. Sadly, we just missed seeing the work in action. Today’s temporary exhibitions included contemporary artist Julian Opie, Six Masterpieces of the Spanish Golden Age: Paintings from Madrid, London and York, and the Birds of Paradise: Plumes & Feathers in Fashion.

Bowes Museum 2014 SLRS

Bowes Museum 2014 SLRS

Personal Favorite: In one of the ceramics rooms there was wonderful wall of espresso cups and saucers. I loved all the various colors and designs shown together. It is also fascinating to see such variations in size. Sadly, my day did not involve the drinking of any espresso. 

Image courtesy of Ute Kirkwood 

Image courtesy of Ute Kirkwood 

Image courtesy of Ute Kirkwood 

Image courtesy of Ute Kirkwood 

   With our Sunday visit to Barnard Castle I slowly continue to explore the Northeast of England. Every time I see more of the country I am amazed by the views and the lived history of each village and city.  This was a charming little day trip I would certainly repeat if only to breathe some more fresh air and fill my mind with lovely, calming sights. 

Bowes' View 2014 SRLS

Bowes' View 2014 SRLS

SRLS 2014

Mixing Realities: 'A Tale for the Time Being' by Ruth Ozeki

 

“And if you decide not to read anymore, hey, no problem, because you're not the one I was waiting for anyway. But if you decide to read on, then guess what? You're my kind of time being and together we'll make magic!”
- Ruth Ozeki, A Tale for the Time Being
 

Published in over thirty countries, A Tale for the Time Being (2013) tells the story of Ruth, a Japanese-American writer living on a small island on the Pacific Northwest coast of Canada shortly after the 2011 Japanese tsunami. Ruth is a New Yorker who moved to the rural island for her husband and environmental artist, Oliver. While struggling to write her novel she comes across a freezer bag containing a diary washed up on the beach shore. This diary, written in purple ink, belonged to the troubled schoolgirl Nao living in Tokyo. As Ruth reads Nao’s diary, she becomes increasing obsessed with 16-year-old’s fate.

 

Nao begins her diary and the book by defining what a “time being” can be- and that she, and we the readers, are all “time beings.” This introductory statement begins the tone of the book: blunt, humorous, rough, and philosophical. Nao spent most of her life in Sunnyvale, California before her father lost his job in the dot-com bubble burst causing the family to return to Tokyo in financial crisis. Nao is miserable, lonely, bullied, and in desperate need of help but her parents are struggling to keep it together as her father repeatedly attempts suicide. The first summer after moving to Tokyo, Nao is sent to live with her 104-year-old great-grandmother and Zen nun for the school holiday where Nao is taught meditation as a “supapawa” for overcoming obstacles and enemies. For Nao, this diary is meant to tell the life story of her great-grandmother so that she may have accomplished something before committing suicide herself.

 

The book is riddled with footnotes of character and French definitions and supplementary information from Ruth analyzing the diary. Ozeki even includes appendices for lengthier information of scientific ideas, religious philosophies, and information tangential to the plot. This use of format is thrilling and well inline with the idea of the free-flow diary and the human thought process. Ozeki explores and touches upon so many themes; it would take hours to describe them all. Some of the more prominent themes include: death and life of individuals and the planet, theory of infinite possibilities, Zen spirituality, magical powers and linked fates, dangers of the internet, bullying, fiction/fact blending, writer/reader relationships, uncompleted intentions, family history and genetics affecting the present, seeking the ‘now’ in time, linking times and distances over the world and history, and the final choice of trying to live or how to die. Moving, deep, thought provoking, humorous, and disturbing: Ozeki pulls simultaneously at various heartstrings while weaving her multiple storyline together. A Tale for the Time Being feels incredibly and universally human.

 

Ruth Ozeki is a novelist, filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist priest splitting her home time between New York City and British Columbia. Her most recent novel, A Tale for the Time-Being (2013) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and has won multiple awards including the LA Times Book Prize for Fiction. Running parallel to the characters in her recent novel, Ozeki is the daughter of a Japanese mother and a Caucasian-American father and is married to a man named Oliver. This highly praised novel deserves all of its recognition and I cannot recommend it enough. The themes take time to develop, but rarely does a novel make me stop and ponder life from so many perspectives. Ozeki’s website and blog is a great place to get little snippets of information on her writing, biography, and research that fuels her writing practice.

Good reading!

http://www.ruthozeki.com/

The Black Dog of Winter

In response to the recent daylight saving time adjustment this past Sunday (here in the UK at least), I thought I would recommend an interesting article entitled 'Can Humans Hibernate? Ask the Dwarf Lemur' by Sheena Faherty (April, 2014). 

As winter draws near, and the darkness immerses many of us in the northern hemisphere, the lure of constant sleep is a strong one. I, myself, feel I could easily be a hibernating black bear this time of the year.  Most people, including those who annually battle SAD (Seasonal affective disorder) can probably relate to the desire of plunging deep under the comforters, engulfing oneself in fluffy warmth for hours on end as dreams flicker in and out. 

Unfortunately for our energy levels, this not a realistic or healthy options. And it is probably better for our social lives and careers if we try not to sleep away the entire winter season. While we start our days (hopefully still for a few weeks) in sunlight and leave work in the dark, it is still amusing to fantasize about human hibernation and if we were able to, how wonderful would it feel?

Below is a link to a wonderful short animation on vimeo about a girl trying to save herself from and within the world around her. While this amazing short called 'Move Mountain' by Kirsten Lepore is about the battle with lyme disease, I think it can be aptly applied to any personally, mentally and physically related battle including depression and/or SAD. In fact, I initially thought it was about depression and so did the person who recommended it to me.

Take a look here! http://vimeo.com/60358403 

Photo still from 'Move Mountain' by Kirsten Lepore 

Photo still from 'Move Mountain' by Kirsten Lepore 


Intimacy in Tangents: relating and uniting various interests and ideas

Intimacy in Tangents: relating and uniting various interests and ideas

 

    Welcome! This blog is a place to explore various interests outside of, or tangental to, my own art production. It will be a place for posts on art, literature, sciences, politics, travel, and anything of particular interest that crosses my path. Tangents, being connected offshoots of thoughts, have a bright life and curiosity to them. They can reveal what the mind finds particularly intriguing and invigorating: even if they are only explored momentarily. 

    I am open to collaborations, suggestions of topics, submissions of articles, or a quick hello and chat. Just email me via the contact page!